Facebook and the Power of Social Media

Photo courtesy of Facebook Stories

Last December 6, 2012, Facebook released a video called “Beyond the Yellow Boat” through their Facebook Stories platform.  It has been an amazing ride for each one of us on board the Yellow Boat (of Hope Foundation) during the last 24 months.

The organization which basically started from my Facebook status at the end of October 2010 is now a foundation – registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) of the Philippines.

We are also now present in 8 communities around the Philippines and also assisting various other causes in the Philippines from time to time especially during natural disasters.  One of the biggest lessons we’ve learned so far is that solutions must always come from a local perspective.  And that is basically one of our driving philosophies – we look for and partner with talented individuals who already have existing organizations or projects in their own localities.  We get to learn from them and they get to learn from us.  More importantly, we also get to learn from the communities we are helping.

When we set out to build the very first school boat for the first community in Layag-Layag, Zamboanga City, we never realized that we were beginning a relationship with this community and build relationships in 7 more communities in Masbate in the Bicol region, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay, Zamboanga del Norte, Cagayan de Oro and Negros Occidental.  We are now collectively touching almost 10,000 lives.

The Yellow Boat has taken me to the US, Singapore, India, France, Italy, Spain and now Pakistan.  Hoping to learn more on how to run nonprofits and social enterprises, I applied to be a Global Fellow of Acumen Fund.  And that’s why I’m currently in Lahore, Pakistan working with a social enterprise that distributes affordable high quality drinking water to the underprivileged.

I know the recently released Facebook video is also an ad for the social network behemoth but again our organization would not have been possible without it.

We are still using Facebook Groups creatively to connect with friends, donors, partners and supporters.  It is a platform for our communities to discuss and to engage in ideas.  It allows us to transcend borders.

It also allowed me to meet wonderful people along the way. One of them is my Co-Founder, Dr. Anton Mari Lim, who is the driving force behind our organization.

It allows us to tell our story better – in a way, that we can share our successes and failures.  The best kind of relationship is one where your donor or supporter can see your mistakes, your faults and you both work hard at it to make it better.

Collaboration is so much better than competition.  We believe that leadership needs to be shared – because at the end of the day, we are all leaders of our own destinies.  It is our individual and collective responsibility to help make the world better especially for children.

We believe that leadership is about sharing powerful stories that will empower and inspire even more leaders.

We believe that leadership has two key responsibilitiesone of inspiration and another of reproduction.  For leadership to be truly shared, a leader must empower others – empower them to do something about the things they are passionate about.

We believe that for leadership to last, a leader must nurture more leaders and not just followers.

Social media allows us to bridge this leadership gap.  My experience tells me that people want to do something good, they want to be part of something bigger, and they want to lead authentic and fulfilling lives.  And all these mentoring and coaching is possible now in the age of Social media.  Facebook for one has allowed us to connect with amazing donors, leaders and partners around the globe who empower us with the resources we need to make a difference.

We collaborate with individuals and organizations from Taiwan, the United States, Australia, France, Spain, Singapore, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Botswana, and Kenya.  The world has truly become flat and interconnected.

We now have the world’s greatest minds at our fingertips.  And we also now have more access to each other.  The best inventions and discoveries were made by ordinary people doing extraordinary things.  And social media allows even more collaboration, even among people who haven’t met personally.

That is the true power of Facebook and Social Media and explains why a simple yellow (school) boat built in a far-flung community in the Philippines has sailed across the world and touched more lives than we can possibly count.

Thank you for reading and here are the links to the video:

[vimeo clip_id=”54999049″ width=”500″ height=”325″]



Please visit us at http://www.yellowboat.org.

How to Change the World in 2013

Last year, I shared how to change the world in this post.

I focused on three items for 2012.

Our #1 priority was to officially register what was then called the Philippine Funds for Little Kids with the SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission).  And last May 23, 2012, my Co-Founder, Dr. Anton Mari Lim of Zamboanga City, was able to secure our papers in Zamboanga City.  We were officially registered as the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation.  We did this because there were already a number of other nonprofit organizations that started their name with the word “Philippine” so we chose the Yellow Boat since most people already referred to us in that name and also no other organization sounds like it.

Our #2 priority was to share our story to as many individuals and organizations as possible.

Collaboration is so much better than competition. We believe that leadership needs to be shared – because at the end of the day, we are all leaders of our own destinies. It is our individual and collective responsibility to help make the world better especially for children.

We believe that leadership is about sharing powerful stories that will empower and inspire even more leaders.

We believe that leadership has two key responsibilities: one of inspiration and another of reproduction. For leadership to be truly shared, a leader must empower others – empower them to do something about the things they are passionate about.

We believe that for leadership to last, a leader must cultivate more leaders and not just followers.

Over the last 12 months, I have been able to share our story to thousands of individuals and around 50 different seminars, workshops, events and conferences.  I have also shared our story in France, Spain, Italy, the United States, Singapore, India, and of course all around the Philippines.

Our #3 priority was to help empower more change makers in the Philippines and even beyond our borders.  We have partnered with 8 distinct individuals and organizations around the Philippines and started local chapters of the Yellow Boat in their localities.  We have also received support from friends, partners and donors from Australia, Taiwan, Singapore, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Canada, France, the Middle East and the United States.

The Yellow Boat has become my life mission.  

I know we are just getting started so early last year I also applied to the Global Fellows Program of Acumen Fund.  It is a one-year training program on social entrepreneurship and that is the reason why I am currently in Lahore, Pakistan working with Pharmagen Water – a social enterprise delivering affordable, clean and safe drinking water to the underprivileged here.

In the next 8 months, I will be working with the management team of Pharmagen Water to help them market the service they are providing better.  After which, I will be flying back to New York then hopefully back to the Philippines around November 2013.

I have learned a lot from my 2 months in New York last year and also learning a lot from Pakistan and Pharmagen Water.

So for 2013, this is how I hope to change the world:

1) Continue to share the story of the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation (I will be sharing it in TEDxKinnaird next month)

2) Help build the Marketing team of Pharmagen Water

Since I will be in Pakistan for the next 8 months, I believe its best to limit my focus on these two projects.

I am fortunate that social media allows me to connect back with my Co-Founders in the Philippines.

That’s it for now, Happy New Year! And assalamu ‘alaikum 2013!

Let’s spread more HOPE!

Facebook Stories team on location in Layag-Layag

As most of you already know, Facebook Stories released the video of the Yellow Boat project last week.

Yesterday, they posted pictures of their team on location in Layag-Layag, Zamboanga City.

Check them out on Facebook at On Location: Beyond the Yellow Boat.

Photo courtesy of Facebook Stories

This is one of my favorite pictures on that visit which shows Skip, Peter and Everett getting dirty on the mud and they never minded it.

Social media allows us to build these offline relationships and learn more about the communities we are helping.  Social media is a tool, it shouldn’t be the only way to connect.

“A single Facebook status can make a difference.”

New York 2012

It has taken me more than 2 months to write about my recent experience in New York – September-November 2012. As many of you already know, I was chosen as one of the 10 Global Fellows for 2013 by Acumen Fund last May 2012 and I’m currently in Lahore, Pakistan working with Pharmagen Water as part of the 12-month program.

New York

Arriving in New York last September was truly exciting. It was my second trip to both the United States and New York City. I was in the US last May 2011 as well along with Alex Lacson, Tony Meloto, Efren Penaflorida and many others for the WeAreOneFilipino (WAOF) event in Las Vegas, Nevada.

I didn’t really know what to expect upon arriving in New York. I guess every child dreams of one day coming to New York City. Given the dominance of Western influences in Asia, more so in the Philippines, I have always dreamed while I was growing up in Cotabato City to one day visit places like New York City, Los Angeles, Rome and Paris.  And today, I have visited all four. Up until four years ago, I never really thought I would be here one day.

All this changed when I boarded the yellow boat of hope more than 2 years ago.

It has been an amazing ride ever since and it brought me to New York City last September 2012.


The Global Fellows Program includes a 2-month training in New York followed by a 9-month placement in one of Acumen’s investees (the reason I’m in Pakistan) and then the fellowship culminates with a mini-graduation in New York (for me that’s around September 2013). I’m excited about this since my birthday falls on September 13, 2013 (9/13/13).

The goal of the program is to develop emerging leaders so that they see this new way of tackling global poverty. Acumen is driving change in the fields of both philanthropy and impact investing by calling for new innovative approaches at tackling poverty where aid and markets have failed. For me, this is an exciting time to be in the social sector. Indeed, given the challenges that the US itself is facing along with Europe, Japan and the rest of the Western world, it is time to re-imagine a new way of doing business.

Back to Acumen

The 2 months of training in New York was nothing short of extraordinary. In a span of 60 days, I have met a NASA astronaut, popular book authors, Muhammud Yunus, met with Filipinos working in the United Nations, and of course I met the amazing 9 other fellows and most importantly, the people working with Acumen. It has been many years since I started following the work by Acumen and it is only after being able to co-found the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation that I felt compelled to become “part” of it. I wanted to learn more about this new field called social entrepreneurship and I wanted to learn more about how they do it and most importantly, why they do it.

Part of the challenges we are facing in the Yellow Boat is how to ensure our support to these communities is sustainable and empowering.

And that is what I set out to learn with Acumen and the investee that I was assigned to (more on that later).

Some of the highlights of the 2 months:

Meeting the team behind LitWorld (on my birthday, September 13)
First day at Acumen Fund’s office with Shahd AlShehail and Michael Craig (September 17)
2012 Fellows graduation night with Junko Tashiro and Jacqueline Novogratz (September 19)
NASA astronaut Ron Garan in Acumen (September 20)
Meeting Muhammad Yunus at the Social Good Summit (September 23)
Leadership retreat at the Berkshires (September 24-28)
The whole gang in Yellow Boat Tshirts before we left the Berkshires (September 28)
Meeting Batman (September 29)
Venture capitalist Jim Hornthal at Acumen (October 5)
Learning Human Centered Design at IDEO (October 13)
Good Society discussions with Jacqueline at Wallkill, New York (October 15-18)
Gangnam style in Yellow Boat Tshirts at Wallkill, New York (October 18)
Manhattan from Williamsburg, Brooklyn (October 20)
Storytelling workshop with The Ariel Group before the Investors’ Gathering (November 7)
Visiting the United Nations (November 12)

New York 2012 was a blast and I look forward to coming back again in September 2013. On November 15, I flew to Lahore, Pakistan, where I am going to spend my next 8 months.

Facebook and the Yellow Boat of Hope

Facebook released the much anticipated video about the Yellow Boat Project last night.

You can find the Facebook Stories feature story here:


[vimeo clip_id=”54999049″ width=”500″ height=”325″]

I would like to personally thank Peter Jordan, Skip Bronkie and Everett Katigbak for creating this video and for coming to Zamboanga City last July 2011 to film our Yellow Boat Community in Layag-Layag.

I also like this post by Click Dominique about the video, [Video] Act local, share global: Facebook user shares localized solutions to Philippine poverty.  Indeed, it’s time we highlight how social media can be used for social good esp. on the largest social network today.

You can also read the coverage on Social News Daily and WebProNews.

To donate to the foundation, please use the donation page on http://www.yellowboat.org. Thank you in advance!

Changing the world, one boat at a time

The Little Dream

We all dream of helping make a difference in people’s lives. In much the same way that a pebble creates ripples when thrown in water.

In 2006, I met one such ‘pebble’ who changed my perspective on life, his name was Alex Lacson.  In 2005, he wrote a wonderful book entitled the 12 Little Things Every Filipino Can Do To Help Our Country.

It became a national best-seller and it allowed him to test his idea that every Filipino can become part of the solution to the problems that our country is facing.

Over the last 6 years, we have heard of wonderful stories inspired by the book. There was a high school class in Muntinlupa City that adopted a scholar, there were families who bought more local products and supported local industries, and there were organizations and companies that adopted their own 12 Little Things that their employees can do to help the country.

While I was growing up, I thought heroes were people who had to die for the country. But there is another aspect of heroism that we are failing to notice – the side of heroism that is in the everyday Filipino.

And this is what this little story of a yellow boat, built in the south, in Zamboanga City, is all about.

I remember vividly the story of the kid who picks up and throws every starfish on the beach back to the sea indifferent to the fact that there are miles and miles of beach with starfishes.

Asked that he couldn’t possibly think he could make a difference, he replied that to those starfishes that he threw back, he surely made a difference.

The “Little” Fund

Last October 30, 2010, I had the opportunity to discuss the role of New Media in Nation-Building to almost 100 bloggers from all over Mindanao for the 4th Mindanao Blogging Summit.  Little did I know then that I was about to become part of the solution to one problem in Zamboanga City.

During the sidelines of the summit, I met with some of our campaign volunteers in the city and one volunteer, Juljimar Gonzales, told me of a story that during the presidential campaign last 2010 their team came across a group of children who were swimming just to be able to go to school.

The story really moved me. I have heard of stories about elementary students having to walk 4, 5 or even 8 kilometers daily just to be able to go to school. But have never heard of children who have to swim or wade through the waters just to go to school.

I couldn’t sleep that night. The next day, I went back to Manila and I felt compelled to share the story on my Facebook status.

I know the story will move people but I didn’t realize it will open their pockets. My good friend, marketing guru, Josiah Go, saw my status update, and we were able to start an online fundraising campaign among his friends (and my friends).

I was surprised because friends and friends of friends excitedly re-posted our call for donations. In less than 7 days, the Zamboanga Funds for Little Kids (as the fundraising campaign came to be known then) raised almost Php70,000.

During this period, I also asked Doc Anton Lim, another volunteer of the President in Zamboanga City, to check the story.

In the middle of November 2010, I called up Anton if we can already look for a boat. We had a hard time finding the right boat for the children so we decided to build it.  Anton Lim, in behalf of the Tzu Chi Foundation, agreed to accept the funds we have raised, and he also raised additional funds from local donors.

It was a difficult journey though. At first, we couldn’t find any boat-maker. We found one but he lived in a far-away community; until finally Doc Anton through Kagawad Jesse Jamolod found a boat-maker (Abraham Mawadi) who came from the village of Layag-Layag itself in Brgy. Talon-Talon in Zamboanga City where the children who swam to school lived. I thought the boat-building would start right away but again we hit another challenge – finding the log to be used.

Fortunately, DENR was listening and CENRO Region IX donated the logs to the project through Tito Gadon.  In January 2011, the boat-building started.

And last March 27, 2011, I joined Tzu Chi Zamboanga for the turn-over of the boat in Layag-Layag, Brgy. Talon-Talon, Zamboanga City.

It took us 5 months to finish the project but nothing can be compared to the joy you feel in your heart when you realize you’ve helped make a difference in people’s lives, no matter how small.

I slept well that night – it was as if I saw God smile back at me.

Nation-building is a difficult project. It requires the participation of each and every one among us. And for the country’s leadership, it is about telling stories that inspire our people to act on the problems they are facing themselves.

The boat we turned over was christened ‘Bagong Pag-asa’ (New Hope) – it is a symbol of change that finally a group is finally noticing this particular community’s problems and challenges.

But more importantly, it is also a symbol of people power in action. It is about ordinary Filipinos helping other ordinary Filipinos.

I believe it is time we extend the meaning of People Power, one that not only changes governments and leaders, but one that also truly empowers our people – a people power that calls on every Filipino to become an active nation-builder.

The Little Heroes

The real heroes in this story are those brave kids in the village of Layag-Layag who crossed the waters just to be able to go to school. Whether by boat or by swimming to school, they have conquered the challenges of water and distance.

The boat is a symbol that serves as a vehicle for knowledge and learning. We hear of stories about affluent kids in Manila who skip school to go swimming but these kids in Layag-Layag go swimming to go to school.

Changing the world is difficult but with the right attitude and with the community working together, we can make things happen, even with just one boat at a time.

I suggest we remember the story of how the barangay came about. During the pre-Spanish era in Philippine history, the term balangay referred to both the boat and the basic political unit in the country, the barangay.

This came about because the nature of building the balangay (boat) requires unity among members of the community. And that is how the barangay was born – members of the community working together to build something, whether it is a boat, a city or a nation.

I am sharing this story because it is my belief that each one of us can be part of the solution and you can start creating solutions to challenges in the communities where you live or work.

It is my fervent hope that this story has touched you in one way or another and that you won’t stop at just reading this – I hope you will you will start creating ripples of your own.

These little things create ripples across the country and sometimes with no end in sight. These small acts of heroism can deliver an impact bigger than originally intended.

To date, there are more than 150 yellow boats all over the Philippines and our group is now present in 8 communities.

Let us all become part of the solution!

Reflections on Money, Love and Life

It’s never easy to pursue your dreams in life. (I’m telling you believe me, it’s never easy!)

It’s quite easy to settle.  To just be contented where you are.  To wake up every morning, go to work, go back home then sleep.  The next day the cycle begins again.

It’s never easy to write about pursuing your dreams in life.  It’s quite hard because some of the things you’re going to share are about your failures.

A few times you succeed but most of the time you fail.

But you keep going… because you believe there’s light at the end of the tunnel.  (Don’t believe me yet but I can sense there’s really a light out there.)

The coming days are frightening me enough (since I’m leaving the Philippines soon, read it here) that I decided I’m going to share some things I’ve learned over the last year.  Life is never easy.

Life is short but it is never easy.

It’s as if life was designed to be a test.  A test of what, I do not know for sure yet.

But challenges and trials are what separates men from the boys as the popular cliche goes.

The Yellow Boat

Over the last 2 years, I have been part of an amazing journey called the Yellow Boat Project.  It has been one hell of a ride.

It started with a single Facebook status that pooled resources to build a yellow school boat for children who used to swim to school.  What then started as a fundraising campaign online to help one community spread to another and then to another and so on and so forth…

To date, we are present in 8 communities around the Philippines and exploring many more.

I feel so blessed to have been a party to the creation of the Yellow Boat of Hope.  As our boats came to symbolize a source of new hope to the communities we are helping.

Since I was a kid, I always dreamed of being able to start my own thing – whether it be a business, a charity, an organization, anything that I can be proud of.

And the Yellow Boat of Hope means that much to me, it is both a childhood and “adulthood” dream.  It has allowed me and my co-founders to build a brand – the Yellow Boat as a symbol of HOPE.

The Yellow Boat of Hope is no longer just an advocacy for me.  It is my life – a personal journey.

On Money

Probably the most common question to me these days is how are you earning?

Leaving my corporate job to join the presidential and senatorial campaign of 2010 was crazy enough but leaving my job at the presidential palace was even crazier.  Having a job there meant one had power or so they say.

Almost everyone I knew was against the idea but I felt like I was serving two masters.  And so I resigned.

I truly enjoyed my “work” in the Yellow Boat Project.  Every night I stayed up so late wondering about the possibilities and every morning I wake up excited to execute those ideas.

My “work” on board the Yellow Boat of Hope is like my way of making a dent in the Universe (ala Steve Jobs).

I had doubts as to my decision but I plunged anyway – encouraged by one donor who told me when God sends you on a mission, he sends provision.

The Yellow Boat of Hope truly feels like a mission.  It is a mission to help children who are struggling to get to school.  And it is helping in one way or another the country to fulfill one of our commitments to the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which is to have universal primary education for all by 2015.

So how am I earning?

The simple answer is I’m not.

No single staff or volunteer of the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation is being paid or compensated including me.  We are all doing this on top of our regular jobs.  And so it puts a lot of pressures on our capabilities to execute our plans but we do it anyway because we believe that education is a right and getting these kids to school should be our priority.

And though it’s hard, I truly believe in this mission.  

I earn from my speaking engagements from time to time and that has partly been responsible for keeping me debt-free.

Also, I have saved some money during my 5 years in the corporate world and I have been dipping into it for the last 12 months.

Having said this, I cannot complain.

Because of the project, I have been to the US, Singapore, France, Italy, Spain, and India to share our story.

I have traveled in more cities and in more continents in the last 12 months than all my previous 29 years combined.

I have also met so many wonderful and amazing people along this journey.  Filipinos who make me proud to be one.  And people who inspire me that we can truly build a world beyond poverty.

And so I believe it’s only a matter of time before I’m going to figure out how to keep myself sustainable as the foundation is slowly reaching its own sustainability too through the help of my co-founders and friends.

I am reminded by a famous quote from Randy Komisar when he said “Only passion will get you through the tough times… It is the romance, not the finance, that makes business worth pursuing.”

So it’s very important to find work that you love because that’s the only way you can truly do great work (ala Steve Jobs again).

Which brings me to the topic of love…

On Love

This is probably the most difficult aspect in nation-building or advocacy work.  People like me don’t have regular weekends.  We work on Saturdays, on Sundays, and even at 2, 3 or 4AM and sometimes just get by with barely an hour of sleep.

At one point, I was out on the road for a consecutive 3 weeks.  It’s really tiring and keeping relationships is always a problem especially when the people close to you don’t understand what you’re doing.

Our parents might also not understand what we do.  They can’t understand why we can’t be just like them.  Things were simple before.  You go to school.  You graduate.  You work.  You start a family.  You work everyday for the rest of your life.  And then you die.

Our friends might also be thinking we’re just going through a phase in life.  And it’s also hard to go out with them since you’re always on the road and sometimes you’re too tired to go out at night.

This is for me the toughest challenge because FOCUS is one important success factor in any thing we do in life and it’s increasingly hard to focus on the person you love when your focus is on getting kids to school.

Balance is key but it is also a delicate balancing act.  I don’t know if that makes sense but there are certainly trade-offs.

I also believe that timing is everything.  Right now, my focus is on helping build the model that will sustain the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation and then also building the right model for myself to sustain my efforts and still be able to start my own family.

I am hoping though that one day I will find her on board the Yellow Boat of Hope.

On Life

In my presentations and talks, I always start it with my favorite quote from the movie “Kung Fu Panda” where Master Oogway (the turtle kung fu master) repeats it three times:

“There are no accidents in life.”

And it is my belief that it is not an accident either that we were able to build the Yellow Boat of Hope.  I don’t like to sound biblical but there are many similarities between our yellow boat and Noah’s ark especially at a time when floods are threatening our way of life and that the sea level is rising.

Boats have always been our primary mode of transportation and up to this day, it is estimated that there are more boats in the Philippines than there are cars or jeepneys.  Just imagine that there are 7,107 islands and the primary mode of transportation between these islands are really boats or ferries.

What I’m simply saying is that I am amazed at how the Yellow Boat of Hope has touched the lives of so many children and families and I never imagined when I was growing up in Cotabato City in Mindanao that I would one day be a part of something like this.

Life may hand us lemons but we can surely make lemonades or even lemonade stands out of it.

Enjoy life!

Catch me

I will be very busy the next 3 weeks starting this coming Tuesday, if you are where I am on a particular day, I’d like to meet!

July 17: Entrepreneurs & Leaders Conference & Expo at Tanghalang Pasigueno, Pasig City Hall Complex, Caruncho Ave., Pasig City

July 18: Globe Youth Summit – Legazpi City at the Albay Astrodome

July 20-26: Bacolod, Iloilo and Guimaras

July 27: St. Scholastica’s College (morning) and De La Salle University (afternoon)

August 1: LOG ON. Lead. Connect. Advocate seminar with Josiah Go and Anton Lim at SM City Cagayan de Oro

August 4: Winning Disciplines for Success seminar with Francis Kong in Cebu at the Radisson Blue Hotel, Cebu City

Thank you for the support and let me know if you want to meet. You can reach me at jay[at]yellowboat.org or @jayjaboneta.

Training at Acumen Fund

Yesterday, July 13, 2012, the US Embassy in Manila approved my application for a J1 Exchange Visitor visa to the United States.  A J1 visa is required for an individual who is joining a training program in a US-based organization.

Some of you may remember that last May 3, 2012, Acumen Fund, announced its 2013 Global Fellows and I am honored to be one of them and the first Filipino to be chosen at that.

It is truly an honor and a privilege to be part of these diverse and inspiring group of individuals who are making such a remarkable impact on poverty in their own respective countries and communities.

Becoming a Global Fellow involves being part of a one-year training program that combines two months of multi-disciplinary leadership training in New York City with a 10-month field placement in India, Pakistan, East Africa or West Africa where each Fellow provides on-the-ground management support to one of Acumen Fund’s investee companies on the front lines of tackling global poverty.

Acumen Fund is a global leader in venture philanthropy with extensive experience in Africa and Asia.

US Department of State Secretary Clinton called Acumen Fund one of the most innovative foundations “combining philanthropy and capitalism” in her January 6, 2011 remarks on development in the 21st Century and Forbes Magazine featured Acumen Fund in a cover article last December 2011.

Here’s my signed copy which I asked Jacqueline Novogratz, Acumen’s founder, to sign during our final interview in Mumbai, India last January 2012.

I am so lucky that my co-founders and partners in the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation, Inc. (aka Yellow Boat Project) have allowed me to participate in this training program and that I hope to learn more about global best practices in the nonprofit and social sectors.  And to apply these learnings when I get back after the program to make our organization better.

Acumen Fund’s vision is that one day every human being will have access to the critical goods and services they need – including affordable health, water, housing, energy, agricultural inputs and services – so that they can make decisions and choices for themselves and unleash their full human potential. This is where dignity starts – not just for the poor but for everyone on earth. 

And one of my personal reasons why I chose to help in the education sector as well is to be able to help children in the Philippines unlock and unleash their full potential because that is what our youth needs today – to learn about life, about history, about culture and the need to understand the world around them in order to succeed in life.

It’s important we give hope to these children because that is what will make them dream to help us build a better future.

The program will start this September and I will be flying to New York then to join my soon-to-be new friends – Mustapha, Abbas, Shahd, Michael, Natalie, Nicole, Mohammed, Christina and Junko as we embark on this transformational journey.

We would be sharing our experience and insights on Acumen Fund’s blog so please take note of the site now: http://blog.acumenfund.org.

Again, I want to thank everyone who have been and are still part of our Yellow Boat Journey and hopefully you will continue to support us at the Yellow Boat of Hope Foundation (and me as we try to take ourselves into the next level in our fight to end poverty).